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Exploring the America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

Exploring the America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park

America Bay track in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is a short, moderate walk with waterfalls, Aboriginal engravings and a stunning picnic spot at the end of the track.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

The track is 1km return, starting from West Head Road off McCarrs Creek Road. Look for the large sign on the side of the road. There is parking on the roadside available. 

There are no bathrooms nearby, so make sure you go before you start the trail.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

While the walk is quite short, it’s a winding walk with plenty to look at along the way, over uneven surfaces. There are plenty of rocks to climb and little water cascades to explore. Right near the entrance there is a a detour to see the Aboriginal rock engravings. The detour is not sign posted so we actually missed it, even though we were looking for it.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

Walking quite slowly, the trail took us 45 minutes to reach the rock platform overlooking America Bay, which is located near the mouth of the Hawksburry River. It used to extend further, however the next park is closed due to hazards. 

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

There is a little waterfall at the rock platform and plenty of shady wide rocks to sit on. We brought a picnic blanket and lunch to enjoy at the lookout.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

Be sure to bring good walking shoes, a hat and sunscreen when doing this walk. 

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

The walking track is one of many on offer in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, so you could very easily do this short walk in conjunction with others. 

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

Entry to the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is $12, so I would definitely advise making a day of it.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

Along the walking trail you’ll encounter woodlands of scribbly gum and bloodwood, and a little creek with crystal clear water. In August and September the wildflowers bloom bright yellow and pink throughout the bush.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is open sunrise to sunset.

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/america-bay-walking-track

America Bay Track Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Sydney Australia

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Fagan Park & Playground Galston Sydney

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Fagan Park & Playground Galston Sydney

Fagan Park in Sydney’s Hornsby shire is a 55 hectare park with themed gardens, playgrounds, historic Netherby Cottage and an Eco Garden to explore.

Fagan Park history

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The Darug people hunted and fished in the region for thousands of years, and were the original inhabitants of the land where Fagan Park sits. The Darug people were forced to leave the land by white settlers as detail above.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Fagan Park is located on a piece of land originally granted to George Hall. After being purchased by the Fagan family it was developed as a citrus orchard  and later a cattle property. The land was donated by the Fagan family for use as a recreational and culture centre. Hornsby Shire Council was appointed as sole trustee for the park, which officially opened in November 1988.

Things to do in Fagan Park

Picnics & Barbecues

Enjoy a picnic or barbecue, with a number of shelters and electric barbecues that accept $1 coins scattered throughout the grounds. (Remember to bring change!)

Gardens of Many Nations

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Take an ambling stroll around the Gardens of Many Nations, which covers 10 hectares and has 11 themed gardens.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The gardens include Japanese, Dutch, Chinese, Australian, African and Mediterranean. The Chinese and Japanese gardens are particularly beautiful in spring with cherry blossom trees blooming. 

Netherby Homestead and Rural Museum

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The original Fagan home, Netherby Cottage, was donated to the Crown under Hornsby Shire Council’s care, control and management in 1979. The cottage and adjoining Rural Museum are a great place to learn about colonial life and local history.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The cottage and museum are open evert Tuesday and second Sunday of each month.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Playgrounds

There are two large playgrounds in Fagan Park, one at the Arcadia Road entrance and one at the Carrs Road entrance.

Arcadia Road playground

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The Arcadia Road playground is a modern space with small and large climbing frames, flying fox, swings, including a Liberty Swing, water play, sand play, slides and turning disc.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

There are picnic shelters and barbecues surrounding the playground, as well as a large toilet block featuring a disabled toilet. 

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The proximity to the car park, playground, toilets and play equipment makes this a popular spot for children’s parties. The picnic shelters are often booked out on weekends for parties.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney

„Carrs Bush playground

Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney

The Carr Bush playground is located in the Carrs Bush area of Fagan Park. The nature-themed playground blends into the surrounding bush landscape.

Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney

Features include climbing logs, a water play feature, swings including a basket swing and disabled swing, an all-abilities carousel and a climbing frame.

There are picnic tables and toilets nearby.

Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney

Eco Garden

The Eco Garden is an educational, sustainable garden. The Council-driven community initiative features over 36 different types of fruit and vegetables, as well as showcasing environmentally friendly gardening techniques.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

The Eco Garden is a great spot for kids, too, with fun features to explore including a scarecrow, sandpit and fairy garden.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Get active

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

„ Fagan Park is the perfect place to get some exercise. There are long, sealed paths perfect for riding bikes or scooters, large graded areas for ball sports, frisbees or kite-flying and bushland with short bushwalking trails.

„Dogs are welcome, however must remain on a lead at all times.

Carrs Bush

Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney

A beautiful 8.5 hectare area of bushland within Fagan Park, Carrs Bush features several short trails with interpretive signage, picnic areas, barbecues and a playground. 

There are over 120 species of native plants in Carrs Bush, including the endangered Sydney Turpentine – Ironbark. Birds, marsupials, amphibians, mammals and invertebrates take refuge here.

Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney Carrs Bush Park Playground Fagan park Galston Sydney

Important info about Fagan Park

There are two accessible / disabled toilets inside Fagan Park. One is located at the Arcadia Road main amenities block; and the other is located at the Carrs Road amenities block.

Small portable barbeques including charcoal are permitted under strict conditions.

There is a privately run kiosk selling light refreshments (open weekends and selected weekdays only). I would highly recommend that you bring your own food and water. The park is perfect for a long, luxurious picnic. 

All barbeques within the park require $1 coins to operate.

There are two car parks, one off Arcadia Road at the main park entrance, and another off Carrs Road. Parking costs $6 per vehicle. 

Dogs are permitted but must stay on a leash at all times.

There are many water birds living in Fagan Park. Please don’t feed them.

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney Fagan Park Galston Sydney

Fagan Park
38-48 Arcadia Rd, Galston
Hours: Daily, 7am-6:30pm
hornsby.nsw.gov.au

Fagan Park Galston Sydney

More things to do in Sydney

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Chase waterfalls in Sydney.

More things to do on the Central Coast.

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Things to do in the Southern Highlands.

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Enjoy one of the best ocean pools in Sydney.

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Things to do in the Blue Mountains.

Plan amazing NSW road trips.

Pick your own fruit: fruit picking Sydney.

The best things to do in Western Sydney and Parramatta with kids.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden: Sydney’s Best Parks & Gardens

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden: Sydney’s Best Parks & Gardens

The Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden is a 123-hectare garden on Sydney’s north shore. Established in 1968, the garden is dedicated to preserving and showcasing Australian plants.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Located adjacent to the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, the garden is home to two endangered ecological communities; Duffys Forest and Coastal Upland Swamp as well as 18 threatened species of flora and fauna.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

The Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden is a beautiful spot to picnic, bushwalk and learn about Australian flora and fauna. 

While some areas of the garden have been cleared from bush such as Lambert’s Clearing, which has a large grassed area with picnic tables and a children’s playground, most of the garden is in a natural bush state.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

The Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden is tended by volunteers from the Australian Plants Society, who cut samples of common wildflowers in bloom and place them on a labelled stand in front of the St Ives Visitor Centre.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

When visiting the Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden, your first stop should be the aforementioned St Ives Visitor Centre to collect a map, and take a quick look at the stick insects and snake on display inside. The visitors centre sells cold drinks and ice blocks. 

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

There is no cafe inside the garden so bring a picnic lunch and plenty of water. There are lots of picnic tables dotted around the gardens for use.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

There are bathroom facilities in several places around the garden, including at the visitors centre.

While most of the garden is quite wild, there are a few features of interest: The Knoll Garden
(a display garden containing native plants from around Australia), the Fern House, Caley’s Pavilion Gardens (featuring a wide variety of showy native flowers, rainforest trees and bush foods such as macadamia, Davidson’s Plum and native ginger).

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Use the map to take one of many walks around the garden. We took the Solander Trail which took about 40 minutes to complete and had plenty of lovely wildflowers along the path. 

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Plenty of the trails are step-free and paved, suitable for strollers or wheelchairs. Other “adventure tracks” offer an off-road trekking experience. 

Step-free paths
The Senses Track
The Senses Track is located at the top of the Wildflower Garden opposite the Visitor Centre.

There are two loops of 400m and 500m respectively, which each take ten minutes or so at a steady pace. Interpretive signage reveals interesting facts about the bushland. This is a great track for kids to enjoy.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

The Solander Trail
The Solander Trail is an almost 2km circuit that takes visitors past some of the best wildflowers in the garden. It takes about 40 minutes to an hour to complete. 

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

The Brown Trail
The Brown Trail is a short detour off the Solander Trail route that offers a view of Donnelly’s Swamp and access to the Mueller Track.

There is also a short, step-free path that winds through Caley’s Pavilion Gardens and boardwalk over the wetland area.

All of these paths are adjacent to accessible picnic areas and toilets.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Short adventure tracks
Banks Track
The Banks Track is 200m in length and takes about 5 minutes.

Smith Track
Smith’s Track is 400m in length and takes 10-15 minutes.

Bentham Track
The Bentham Track is 400m long and takes about 10 minutes.

Caley Track
Caley Track is 200m long and takes about 5 minutes.

Wilderness path
Mueller Track
A strenuous walk of 4km in length.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

I really enjoyed looking around the  Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Nursery, located inside the Visitors Centre. The nursery specialises in local indigenous plants. It also stocks a variety of native plants suitable for planting in Sydney gardens.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Garden runs programs for kids throughout the year. You can see what’s coming up online.

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden, 
420 Mona Vale Road, St Ives (entry off Richmond Avenue).
kmc.nsw.gov.au

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Find a list of the best things to do in Sydney with kids.

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Get a list of the best kid-friendly beaches in Sydney.

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Chase waterfalls in Sydney.

More things to do on the Central Coast.

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Things to do in the Southern Highlands.

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Ku-ring-gai Wildflower Garden

Oatley Park: Playground, Baths, Cycling Tracks & Picnic Facilities

Oatley Park, Sydney

Oatley Park: Playground, Baths, Cycling Tracks & Picnic Facilities

Oatley Park is a 45-hectare bushland reserve on the northern side of the Georges River. It is bounded by the Georges River, Lime Kiln Bay, and Jew Fish Bay. Oatley Park features an inclusive adventure playground, a netted swimming bath, short, easy bush walking tracks, picnic areas and other free amenities for the local community to enjoy. 

Oatley Park, Sydney

The park was created on the headland in 1887, and over the years has been upgraded to create a spot for locals to enjoy recreational sports, cycling, walking, swimming and playing.

Navigating Oatley Park

Oatley Park, Sydney

There is a one-way driving loop around the park that is shared by cars, cyclists and pedestrians. The maximum speed of the road is 20km/h. Free all-day car parking is available

Oatley Park Inclusive Adventure Playground

Oatley Park, Sydney

The Oatley Park Inclusive Adventure Playground is an adventure playground designed to blend into its bush setting, incorporating nature-based play elements and built with predominantly natural materials. 

The Oatley Park Adventure playground design incorporates community feedback and ideas and follows the NSW Government’s ‘Everyone Can Play’ inclusive play space guidelines to create accessible play elements for children of all abilities in over 80 per cent of the playground.

Read more about the Oatley Park Inclusive Adventure Playground.

Oatley Park Bird Life

Oatley Park, Sydney

There have been 145 species of birds recorded in the bushland of Oatley Park, including its tidal mud flaps, mangroves and Lime Kiln wetlands. We spotted a huge amount of sulfur-crested cockatoos but keep your eyes peeled for the many other species that live in this sanctuary.

Websters and Hills Peak Lookouts

The lookouts are accessed by the road (you can pull your car over and hop out to take a look) and feature stunning views over Jew Fish Bay and Lime Kiln Bay.

Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney

Oatley Castle

Oatley Castle is a surprising feature of Oatley Park. Built around 1935, the castle was created as a kind of “beach house” that would resemble an old British castle, give views over Oatley Bay and become an attraction for visitors to enjoy.

The castle is accessed by walking/cycling from the playground, or driving. There is a car park next to the base of the castle for easy access, and a ramp from the base of the castle to top for wheelchairs/strollers. 

Oatley Castle has bbq facilities inside it and can be hired for events.

Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney

Oatley Park Walking Tracks

Oatley Park Playground

Oatley Park features seven walking tracks of varying length and difficulty, and a 2km cycling/driving/walking loop on paved road in a shared car/bike/pedestrian zone. The road is one direction only, so if you overshoot a spot where you want to park/turn off, you will need to keep driving around the loop and return to the spot again. There is a maximum speed of 20km/h around the park.

The Myra Wall Garden has a wheelchair accessible bushwalking path.

You can read about the walking trail options here.

Sandy Bay – Oatley Park Baths – Jew Fish Bay Baths

On the easterly section of the headland is Jew Fish Bay. Featuring a 320m long shark-proof net, the bay is home to an area called Sandy Bay, featuring Oatley Park Baths / Jew Fish Bay Baths. Oatley Baths was constructed in 1909 and has been the home of the Oatley Amateur Swimming Club since 1927. A popular swimming spot in warmer months, the baths feature one of only a few suspended net enclosures in Sydney, and are one of only two baths/pools in the region to be formed by enclosing a natural shoreline.

The water is a bit muddy when shallow, but is a calm, serene place to swim, with stunning views over the Georges River. The original change rooms are still in operation on the site of the baths.

To reach the baths, drive down to the carpark and walk the rest of the way. There is a ramp and stairs to access the baths.

Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney

Myra Wall Garden

The circular Myra Wall Garden was constructed in 1964 to honour a local conservationist. Parking is beside the garden which is located 300m on the left from the main entrance, along
the main road.

Oatley Park – Important Information

There are no direct public transport links to the park. It is a 1.7km walk from Oatley Station. The 954 bus service from Oatley Station drops you 700 metres from the entry to Oatley Park. 

Entry to the park via Oatley Park Avenue is narrow and means that often, only one car at a time can pass through. AVOID entry and exit to the park during school drop off and pick up. You can also drive in via Douglas Haig St. 

There is a car park at the playground. If this is full, try Myra Wall Garden, Frog Hollows and the Oval – they function as overflow carparks.

The park closes at sunset and the vehicle gates are locked. Make sure if you have driven in, to leave before the gates are locked as there is a fee to retrieve your car.

There are free BBQ and picnic facilities available throughout the park, including next to the playground.

Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney Oatley Park, Sydney

Oatley Park
1 Dame Mary Gilmore Drive, Oatley NSW
Get Directions

More things to do in Sydney

Find a list of the best things to do in Sydney with kids.

Find things to do in Sydney for free.

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Find the best animal experiences in Sydney.

Visit the best kid-friendly restaurants in Sydney.

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Head to one of the best museums in Sydney.

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Enjoy one of the best ocean pools in Sydney.

First time visiting Sydney? Get tips for first time visitors to Sydney.

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Find the best ice cream and gelato in Sydney

Things to do in the Blue Mountains.

Plan amazing NSW road trips.

Pick your own fruit: fruit picking Sydney.

The best things to do in Western Sydney and Parramatta with kids.

Oatley Park, Sydney

Secret Sydney: Wendy Whiteley’s Secret Garden

Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me

Sydney’s Lavender Bay is the perfect spot to enjoy the spectacular Sydney scenery and let time pass by. If you turn your back to the gorgeous view and walk a up a stealthy flight of stairs, you’ll find yourself somewhere a bit magical – Wendy’s Secret Garden.

Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me

The garden was created in 1992 by Wendy Whiteley, wife and muse to artist Brett Whiteley, following her by then ex-husband’s death. Before Wendy turned the patch of land into the whimsical retreat it is today, it was a dumping ground, overgrown with weeds. The lot is officially owned by NSW State Railways, but after Wendy’s incredible efforts to turn it into a treasure to be enjoyed by the general public, the government has agreed lease the land to North Sydney Council on a 30-year renewable lease, securing it for hopefully generations to come.

Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me

The garden lies beneath the home Wendy shared with her husband and their daughter, Arkie. What started as a therapeutic way for Wendy to channel her grief following Brett’s death turned into a creative outlet for her, and a sanctuary for locals and visitors.

Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me

Wendy invested millions of her own money into the project, with the resulting garden filled with tall Moreton Bay figs, flowers and shrubs.

Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me

We took Cheese to visit the secret garden recently, and she, like the many other children we encountered along it’s winding pathways and steep climbs, was enchanted by the hidden trails, secret sculptures and beautiful plants. Many families we encountered had brought a picnic and whiled away the afternoon at the various tables, chairs and benches set up for general use, while their kids enjoyed discovering the secrets contained in the special garden.

Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me Wendy's Secret Garden, Sydney via christineknight.me

Wendy’s Secret Garden
Lavender Bay
Get Directions

Tips for Bushwalking with Preschoolers

Tips on bushwalking with preschoolers via christineknight.me

I recently took Cheese, aged four, on her first proper bush walk in Katoomba. We had an amazing walk to the Minni Ha Ha Falls (you can read about it here). It got me thinking about how different it is bushwalking with little kids – not better or worse, but different.

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

Tips for bushwalking with small kids:

Over estimate the time it will take
The walk we did was 1.3km and should have taken an adult 15 minutes, it took us over an hour. Make sure you have plenty of time when you set out so there isn’t any rushing involved on either end of the walk.

Go slow and enjoy the journey
When I do bush walks on my own, I tend to rush through the bush to get to the waterfall at the end. When walking with Cheese, however, the walk is about the leaves and skinks and butterflies we encounter along the way. She enjoyed all the elements of the bush just as much as she did the waterfall at the end. Don’t set a time limit, just enjoy the journey.

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

Pack extra clothes
Particularly pack extra shoes and socks in the car (or backpack if you travelled by public transport) and shorts/dress if your child is like mine and won’t wear anything else. Even on days when it hasn’t rained in weeks, we often find mud on the trails, and are always glad to have spare shoes to change into.

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

Prepare for swimming
If there is the potential for a dip, bring swimmers and a small quick-dry towel, plus a wet bag. Waterfall pools can be incredibly cold, even in the middle of summer, so there is a high chance of swimmers being worn and no actual dips happening. Do be aware of slippery rocks when there is water involved.

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

Stock up on food
Bush walks make for hungry kids. We stopped at the base of the waterfall for a picnic so Cheese had energy for the return trip. We packed a sandwich, rice crackers, banana, apple and many bottles of water.

Get ready for the elements
Don’t get caught out – the bush is a dangerous place. Wear closed-toe shoes, a hat and a short that covers your shoulders to prevent sunburn. take plenty of water even if it’s only a short hike. Also take wipes or tissues incase a bush wee presents itself!

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

Conserve strength for the end
There is always carrying involved for us. Our daughter was a champ on this walk and did most of it on her own, but still needed to be carried for the last three-quarters of a kilometer. We often bring a baby backpack carrier that takes kids of bigger weight for this exact reason.

Have you been bushwalking with your kids? I’d love to hear your favourite walks.

Sydney Day Trips With Kids: Minni Ha Ha Falls, Katoomba

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

The Blue Mountains are full of insanely beautiful waterfalls, many of which are well known and full of tourists, like the Katoomba and Wentworth Falls. We like to get off the beaten path a bit and avoid selfie sticks, so took a stroll one fine summer’s day out to the adorably named Minni Ha Ha Falls in North Katoomba (and yes, I wanted to visit them just so I could say over and over again “Minni Ha Ha”!).

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

The Minni Ha Ha Falls (also known as Minniehaha Falls and Minnihaha Falls) are just past the main Katoomba city centre turn off, on the opposite side of the road. From the Great Western Highway turn onto Civic Plaza, then turn left to the Station Street and follow Victoria Street until South Street, where you need to turn right. Turn left onto Minni Ha Ha Road and drive until you reach the small car park at the end of the road. This is Minni Ha Ha Reserve – a large park with a small playground and a few picnic tables.

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

The 1.3km trail to the Minni Ha Ha Falls begins in the reserve. There is only one trail to follow until right before the falls come into view, so it’s very easy to find, although the path is very steep in the second part, very rocky, and, if it’s been raining, like it had been just before we visited, very slippery and filled with muddy puddles. Right before the waterfall are several sections with steep stairs and handrails. Cheese was a bit scared to do down them but, with a bit of encouragement, she descended them successfully.

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Don’t be put off by this description. While the walk was hard with a preschooler, it was absolutely do-able and Cheese had an amazing time. We helped her over the hardest bits, or where the path was flooded, but she otherwise walked the entire route there and back again on her own.

Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me Minni Ha Ha Falls Katoomba Australia via christineknight.me

The trail leads right to the base of the falls, which are a pretty impressive 20-metres tall. If you’re brave enough (and don’t feel the cold!) you can swim in the pool at the bottom, right underneath the waterfall.

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Be warned: there are no bathrooms nearby, so go at the service station on the highway or be prepared for bush wees.

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Check out things to do in Sydney on a rainy day here.

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