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Sydney Kids: The Art Gallery of NSW for Families

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Sydney’s Art Gallery of NSW (AGNSW) was established in 1871, a home to international and Australian permanent art collections, temporary exhibitions, programs and research. The gallery has a particularly beautiful collection of colonial and 19th-century Australian works and European old masters, as well as galleries dedicated to the arts of Asia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

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I’ve been visiting the art gallery since I was a teenager. First on school excursions, and then later with friends and my now husband. I’ve loved art all my life and introduced my daughter to art as a baby, hoping that she will grow up to similarly appreciate the arts.

We love visiting the gallery during their family programs as they makes art so much more accessible to young people. The AGNSW has a busy schedule for kids of all ages, from toddlers to teens, and, best of all, the majority of them are free!

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Our favourite program is the twice-monthly “drop in and make” art activity. Held in the entrance court of the gallery, the activity is free and suitable for kids of all ages plus their carers/families. The activities are always designed so that little kids can enjoy scribbling if they like, and older kids can create something really beautiful that is themed to a current exhibition.

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This month the art-making activity was crafty kimono cards, taking inspiration from the Japanese art of Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. We were provided with materials and instructions on how to make a kimono card with a special hidden pocket to store secrets.

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There is no time limit on making the activities, which was lucky for us as we sat there making our card for over an hour. The drop in activities are very popular, particularly on rainy days. We were told we should come back a few hours later (not sure what we were meant do with a kid until then?) but decided to wait until a table freed up, which was only about 5 minutes luckily. About half an hour later the majority of tables were empty, so I advise waiting for a table rather than taking the staff’s advice to leave.

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On the lower level of the gallery we discovered another free family activity area free with a different activity: “make your own zine”.

This space is also home to rotating activities for kids or adults to enjoy. At the moment, you can create your own self-published booklet filled with ideas, words and images. The activity is inspired by Indonesian artist Eko Nugroho whose exhibition is currently on display in the gallery.

This area of the gallery is open Monday to Friday from 11am to 4pm during the school holidays (26-30 September, 2-7 October), as well as every weekend. During the school holidays, gallery staff will be on-hand to provide instruction, inspiration and additional collage materials.

The AGNSW also has age-specific programs running throughout the year. “Kids Club” for ages 5-8 and”Art Club” for ages 9-13 both run on weekends with “tour for tots”, ages 2-5, on week days. For kids with special needs and their carers, “children’s access workshops” runs once a month on week days, and during the school holidays there are special workshops for kids and teens such as calligraphy and “clay club”.

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Get more information on family programs at the AGNSW.

Art Gallery of NSW
Art Gallery Rd, Sydney NSW 2000
Hours: Daily 10am-5pm (Wednesdays open until 10pm)
Prices: FREE
Online: artgallery.nsw.gov.au
Get Directions
Getting there: get the train to Circular Quay and walk, or park at the Domain parking station which is right next door to the art gallery. Weekend parking is $10 all day.

More things to do in Sydney

Find a list of the best things to do in Sydney with kids here.

Find things to do in Sydney for free here.

Get a list of the best kid-friendly beaches in Sydney.

Find the best animal experiences in Sydney here.

Visit the best kid-friendly restaurants in Sydney here.

Find the best high teas in Sydney here.

Head to one of the best museums in Sydney here.

Check out things to do in Sydney on a rainy day here.

Enjoy one of the best ocean pools in Sydney here.

First time visiting Sydney? Get tips for first time visitors to Sydney here.

MCA Sunday Family Fun Day

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The Museum of Contemporary Art in the Rocks is a regular fixture on our outing agendas, particularly when their Sunday Family Fun Day series is on. Around once a month (usually the last Sunday of each month) the MCA hosts a special day for families on level three in the National Centre for Creative Learning.

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We’ve been to three or four of these “fun days” now, and really enjoy the format that each one follows.

1. Sign in at the level three learning centre and hand over a $5 donation.

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2. Collect a “sketch activity card” – each month a different card is created by the MCA Artist Educator to inspire kids to explore the permanent collection in the gallery downstairs. The theme of activity is mirrored in the activities set up back in the learning centre.

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On our most recent visit, the theme was “signs and symbols”. We were sent to find symbols around the gallery, then report back upstairs for the next step.

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3. Get hands messy with art and craft activities in the learning centre.

Friendly MCA staff set the room up with activities that are designed to be adult-led. Whole family participation is encouraged, making this activity session an enjoyable way for parents to connect with their kids.

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The activities are always set up to enable kids of a wide range of ages and abilities to participate. The guide is ages 4-12: we have been attending since just before Cheese turned four, so have always been on the parent participation end – but I can see that with a child who is closer to 12 that parents wouldn’t need to be so hands on.

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The learning centre is a fabulous space. Light and bright, with huge glass windows that look over the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it’s a delightful way to spend a few hours with your child.

While a theme is encouraged, it’s not mandatory, so kids can really make whatever they want with the materials provided. On our most recent visit the theme was “signs and symbols” and there was an option to make your own encoded book, but Cheese preferred sticking tape on the window and creating a box that she covered in her own special symbols.

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4. Outside the learning centre is an additional room for children that is always open as part of one of the museum’s main exhibitions. It often features activities for kids to create something like a drawing that is then projected onto a screen in the next room, which is set up with projectors.

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On our recent visit, the room was set up like a movie set green screen, and kids could participate in a little movie magic, exploring how using various materials and signs would make them disappear on the large screen.

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5. Eat! For a bit of a fancy meal, try GRACEMCA down on ground level (read about our delicious meal at GRAZEMCA here), or grab a more casual meal or snack on the level four Sculpture Terrace & Cafe (check out our experience dining at the MCA Sculpture Terrace & Cafe here)

Check out the MCA’s website for details on their next Sunday Family Fun Day.


Museum of Contemporary Art
140 George St,
The Rocks NSW 2000
Phone: (02) 9245 2400
Get Directions

The Art of the Brick: DC Comics

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There’s still time to see the amazing The Art of the Brick: DC Comics exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum before it closes on May 1.

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This contemporary art exhibition by LEGO® artist Nathan Sawaya uses over a million bricks to create more than 120 large-scale sculptures of famous DC Comics superheroes and villains.

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We enjoyed seeing interpretations of Wonder Woman, Superman, Batman, The Joker and Super Girl made, astonishingly, out of LEGO bricks. The exhibition is spread over 10 galleries, and is the world’s largest collection of DC Comics-inspired LEGO ever created.

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I visited with two almost five-year-olds who were mostly interested in finding Wonder Woman, and the LEGO video that filmed in one of the middle galleries.

The Art of the Brick: DC Comics via christineknight.me

The exhibition is hands-off until the last section, so keep your eye on little ones who might want to grab the LEGO for themselves.

The Art of the Brick: DC Comics via christineknight.me

If you visited during the first few months and are a hardcore fan, you might want to revisit before the exhibition closes to see the new sculpture that has been added to the collection to coincide with the Australian launch of Warner Bros. Pictures film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Called ‘Showdown’, the piece features a battle between Batman and Superman, made from over 30,000 bricks.

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The exhibition ends in a gift shop with large Duplo and LEGO areas for kids to build in, plus superhero video games to play. It was almost impossible to drag the kids out.

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During the school holidays you’ll get even more value for the entry fee with the free activities run by the Powerhouse Museum. Our girls highly enjoyed colouring in the Giant Comic Strip and the Bird’s-eye Super Hero Photos, both open daily until April 25.

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The Super Hero photo was a particular hit. The kids donned Wonder Woman capes and had their photo taken to make it look like they were soaring through the air.

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Note: The exhibition is extremely popular right now, so I recommend buying tickets in advance and try to make it to the 10am session (the first session of the day).

After checking out the exhibition and activities, be sure to drop by the Wiggles Exhibition on the ground floor. It’s been updated with Emma Wiggle.

Powerhouse Museum
500 Harris St, Ultimo NSW 2007
Online

Nutcote: Walking in the footsteps of May Gibbs

Nutcote: Walking in the footsteps of May Gibbs via christineknight.me

Nutcote, the home of Australian author and illustrator May Gibbs, has long been on my “must see” list in Sydney. As 2016 marks the 100th anniversary of her most famous work, the Gumnut babies, I thought it was time to finally make that 10 minute drive to Neutral Bay to pay homage to an author/illustrator whose stories entertained me as a child, and inspired me as an adult.

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May Gibbs’ Nutcote, where she lived for 44 years, is now a visitable house museum after many years of changing hands. The home was designed by popular architect B. J. Waterhouse, a friend of May’s whom she would catch the ferry across the harbour to her studio each day. It’s believed he might have given her “mates rates” because of their friendship.

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The house sites on a parcel of land bought by May’s mum, Cecilia Rogers, with May moving into the house with her husband, James Ossoli Kelly, in 1925. The couple never had any children (she called the gumnuts her “babies”) and, after May’s death in 1969, the estate was left to UNICEF.

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Nutcote was then sold to a private party in 1970 who had plans to demolish it (when you see the view from the block of land you’ll understand why it was in demand for redevelopment), but the house was thankfully saved by the newly formed May Gibbs Foundation in 1987. The house was placed on the Register of the National Estate and then bought by North Sydney Municipal Council for $2.86m in 1990. With its future finally safe, Nutcote was restored to represent what life would have looked like there in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and opened to the public in 1994.

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The house is on an amazing block of land that sprawls down to the harbour. The view is just stunning – it’s easy to see why May would have been inspired to write here, in her little slice of paradise.

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At the entrance to the property is the giftshop (it used to be a garage), with the cafe underneath in what was once the gardener’s flat. The actual house is further down past the gardens. Visitors are welcome to roam around the house, but I would suggest taking a free guided tour from one of their very well-versed volunteers.

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The house contains replica furniture in the style of the original furnishings, with some original items, such as photographs, the ice chest and May’s work desk, set up by the window taking in the view.

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Underneath the house is a perfect spot for kids, with a little set of table and chairs, colouring in sheets and pencils and dress ups clothes.  There is also a DVD playing on repeat that tells May’s story if you can convince the kids to sit down long enough to let you watch it.

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Keep heading down the stairs to the final section of the garden, where we found a basket set out with more colouring in equipment for kids. We took a lovely siesta down here undisturbed for quite some time. Cheese happily coloured in en plein air, while the hubbie and I took in the view and relaxed. Ahhhh the serenity.

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Dotted around the garden are little tributes to May’s life. The Big Bad Banksia man stealing Ragged Blossom, a Scots Terrier (the breed of dog May kept in her home), the caterpillar hedge and, of course, “Bib and Bub”, who we know as Snugglepot and Cuddlepie.

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After enjoying the view, art and tour of the house, it’s time for lunch, so we dropped by the Bib and Bub Tea Room. The tea rooms is usually open during Nutcote’s open hours, but, as it is staffed by volunteers, it’s recommend that you call ahead if you are planning to lunch there.

Nutcote: Walking in the footsteps of May Gibbs via christineknight.me

The tea room serves light refreshments such as tea and coffee, scones, cakes and sandwiches. We had an egg sandwich, made freshly with herbs from the garden, a “fairy sandwich” and a brownie.

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A delicious, light lunch, and possibly the best egg sandwich (definitely the freshest!) I’ve ever eaten.

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It’s impossible to pass through the exit without buying a little souvenir or two – we chose the children’s book “A Day With May Gibbs At Nutcote” which has since been a bedtime favourite at home. All proceeds go back to the foundation to keep the house in great condition and open to the public.

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Nutcote
5 Wallaringa Ave, Neutral Bay
Phone: (02) 9953 4453
Hours: Wed-Sun 11am-3pm
Prices: $10 adults $4 children aged 5 and over
Online: http://www.maygibbs.com.au
Accessibility: Some stairs.
Get Directions
NOTE: Nutcote will be closed from March 25 until late June for renovations.

The Early Start Discovery Centre: Australia’s First Children’s Museum

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Australia’s first children’s museum has opened in Australia! The Early Start Discovery Space in Wollongong is the country’s only dedicated “Children’s Museum”. Last weekend we drove the hour and a half south of Sydney to check it out and see what made it different from a regular play space.

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The Early Start Discovery Space is located on, and operated by, the University of Wollongong. It was designed to teach children through play using interactive exhibits. It was created using educational resources and is mapped to the NSW Board of Studies K-6 Syllabus. The museum is suitable for kids from birth to age 12, with the lower level completely accessible and some of the best family bathrooms I’ve ever seen.

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We visited on a bit of a dreary day and expected the place to be crawling with people. It wasn’t. We were happy surprised that while there was a constant buzz of people in the space, it was certainly not full or so busy that Cheese couldn’t try her hand at every single exhibit without having to wait her turn. I ran into a friend there who mentioned how busy it was that day, compared to during the week, so I imagine if you do visit on a week day you might have this entire magnificent space to yourself!

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The museum is spread across two floors, with each exhibit in a designated area. Upon entry we received a very helpful map which enabled us to plan our visit.

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The majority of the exhibits are on the entry level:

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Shipyard
Ahoy, it’s pirate play!

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Tummy Tour
Crawl through a human digestive tract! In through the mouth, out through the … you get the picture.

The Early Start Discovery Space via christineknight.me
Construction Site
Learn about safety on building sites, dress up in a vest, hard hat and tool belt, and build the city. Kids can lay carpet tiles, place mortar and bricks in the house to build walls, or thread pipes and connectors into the frame.

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Market Place
Littlies will love “shopping” with realistic-looking groceries, and older kids can use a shopping list to collect their goods and then “buy” them.

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CreARTivity Space
The place for artists to let their imaginations go wild. This space also features daily educator-led activities.

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Book Nook
A quiet spot to enjoy a book or join story time activities.

The Early Start Discovery Space via christineknight.me
The Cave
Grab a torch and discover stalactites and stalagmites.

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Lights, Sound, Action!
Kids can dress up in costume and perform.

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Games Area
Big kid games like chess and giant Connect Four.

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Crawler’s Cubby
Soft play for babies plus gears for toddlers/preschoolers.

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The Pod
A 2 story interactive LCD screen where kids can be part of the story on the screen in front of them.

The Dig/Archeology was closed for maintenance on our visit.

Also scattered around the floor are little nooks with activities like building, threading and puppets.

The Early Start Discovery Space via christineknight.me

The floor is a giant circle with the exhibits and amenities spread around the inside and outside edges of the circle. It’s fantastic as kids can literally run in circles here and find it endlessly entertaining to start over at the exhibits they already discovered as they entered. Hours of fun, guaranteed.

Upstairs are activities best suited for slightly older kids.

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Digital Media Lab
Kids can learn how to create an eBook, an ePoster, video and editing

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Galileo’s Study
This science-themed area teaches kids how a telescope works and basic astronomy.

The Early Start Discovery Space via christineknight.me

When it’s time for a snack, head outside to The Discovery Gardens. There are shaded picnic tables so you can bring your own food, and take a breather while kids explore the fruit and veggie beds, quarry and creek.

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If you’re like us and never pack lunch (busted!) try the onsite cafe, Espresso Warriors, where all-day brekkie is on the menu, as well as amazing looking pastries and a kids menu that features meals like ham and cheese toasties, fish, sweet potato chips and grilled chicken for $10-11. Each kids meal comes with fresh fruit and a juice box.

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The Early Start Discovery Space
University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong.

The Discovery Space is located on Ring Road opposite the Western (P4) Car park.
Hours: Tues-Sun 9am-4pm (Closed Mondays)
Prices: Adults and children 12 months and over: $15. Children under 12 months: free.
Get Directions

Pirate Fun at the Australian National Maritime Museum

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Swashbuckling fun for the whole family awaits at the Australian National Maritime Museum. Confession: I’ve never been to this museum before. I thought Cheese was way too young for it and as she’d showed zero interest in boats, didn’t think we’d be visiting till she was much older.

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I’m so glad we dropped by during the school holidays however, as their various pirate exhibition and themed activities were an incredible hit with my four-year-old.

Pirate Fun at the Australian National Maritime Museum via christineknight.me

Kids on Deck: Patch-eyed Pirates
The entrance to this activity space is outside the main museum so we almost missed it completely. I’m so glad we didn’t, as it’s a fantastic area for kids aged 4-12. Kids can get busy crafting pirate ships, dressing up, building with Lego, reading pirate-themed books, playing games and making temporary tattoos.

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Daily, 27 December 2015–25 January 2016
Times: 10am–4pm (hourly sessions)
Ages: 4–12
Cost: Entry with any paid ticket

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Family Theatre Show: Calico Jack and the Pirate Cat
We spent a lot of time lining up to get into the theatre, and then waiting for the show to start. Possibly because we were there during school holidays, half the theatre was already filled with kids from daycares when we went in, meaning there weren’t enough seats for everyone. Lesson learned: line up even earlier if we want a seat! The show was a lot of fun, and our two four-year-olds and one 2-year-old were mesmerised the entire time by this lively and interactive theatre show.
Daily except Saturdays, 3–24 January 2016
Times: 11.30am and 2pm
Ages: 4–12 and adults

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Horrible Histories: Pirates The Exhibition
The main attraction this school holiday is the extremely well done Horrible Histories: Pirates The Exhibition. The brand-new exhibition is very hands on and interactive, filled with a mix of digital and manual activities for kids, ranging from knot-tying to discovering treasure, firing cannons (the most popular area in the exhibit) and “squishing” projected rats. Cheese could have squished rats all. day. long.

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The exhibit is based on the bestselling Horrible Histories series which Cheese is too young for, but that didn’t make any difference to her enjoyment of of the exhibit.

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There was just so much for kids to do, all packed into the one room, it was quite impressive. Particularly how the exhibit had been designed to appeal to kids of a wide variety of ages. Since I was with a very active four-year-old we missed all the interesting info about the history of pirates, the ships they sailed and the rules they lived by. Instead we fired canons, stuck giant magnets on walls and took funny pirate pictures of each other.

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At the end of the exhibit is the Passenger Theatrette, which shows episodes of Horrible Histories from 2:30pm daily. A perfect way to wind down after the frenetic activity of the Pirate Exhibition.

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Daily until 27th April, 2016
Adult $20, kids 4-15 $12, under 4 is free.

We didn’t even get to explore all of the amazing things for kids to do at the museum. Next time we will try the Under 5s Tour, which promises stories, songs and dancing through the galleries, and the Cabinet of Curiosities, where visitors can touch objects like weapons and navigational tools related pirates.

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There’s no eating inside the museum, but you only need to pop outside to the adorable Yot’s Cafe for waterfront dining with a pirate theme.

Australian National Maritime Museum via christineknight.me

Added bonus – toys for kids to play with an even a little kiddie-sized table and chairs to sit at.

Australian National Maritime Museum
2 Murray St, Sydney NSW

Open daily except Christmas Day
Hours: 9:30am-5pm (6pm in Jan)
Prices: Permanent galleries are free but still require a ticket to view them.
Big Ticket (Access to everything open on the day of visit including the ships), Adult $30, kids 4-15 $18, under 4 is free
Special Exhibitions Ticket (Access to major temporary exhibitions such as Pirates) Adult $20, kids 4-15 $12, under 4 is free.
Get Directions

 

Summer at the Sydney Opera House

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This January, the Sydney Opera House is jam packed with free fun for kids. Drop by the House to enjoy this free fun (you don’t need to be seeing a show to play – just pop on in!).

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Creative Play: The Unbroken Line
January 2016, 10am-4pm
Kids can try to break un unbreakable digital line on a massive interactive digital wall. The line twists into patterns as it is pulled and pushed by participants, turning into a glorious array of colour and light. I visited with other kids aged from 4-6 and it was torture removing kids from this play area to take them home. This play space is a wonderful respite from the heat on hot days, so take advantage of it!

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‘Salsedine’ Summer Playground
January 2016
This month, the Western Broadwalk and Foyers at Sydney Opera House have been transformed into an Italian Riviera. Enjoy alfresco dining and family-friendly entertainment by the Hot Potato Band, Kiki and Pascal and The Jitter Bugs, set against, stunning Sydney Harbour views.

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Food choices included fruit cups $7 and pastries from $5, or Italian dishes like antipasto, panini and pizza cooked in a coal oven from 12pm till late.

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Lounge in the sun (or, like us, under a shady patch) and enjoy free family-friendly performances, or take a breather while kids build castles in the sand pit. We caught Kiki and Pascal’s performances and were very entertained. Suitable for kids and adults, their comedy/magic/acro act was light and uplifting.

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Kids can also get close to nature with Nature Play at the House. The nature corner lets kids use all their senses in play, from smelling plants in the garden, building with wood and decorating garden-themed colouring pages.

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Chrissie Gifts Sorted at the Myer Christmas Giftorium

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

The holiday season is my favourite time of year. I admit to going a bit overboard with the festivities – I just can’t help myself. This past weekend I was invited to the opening of the Myer Christmas Giftorium in Sydney. The Giftorium is more than just a store, it’s a really one-stop Christmas destination in Sydney where kids can meet Santa, write him a letter with their wish list, ride a mini train and also check out the hottest gifts for the whole family.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

The Frozen and Disney section was a very popular section of the store, particularly the Elsa singing gloves and Anna and Elsa dolls. Still a hit, almost two year on. This is also the area where you’ll find Toy Story, Minnie & Mickey, Cinderella, Marvel Avengers and Inside Out toys.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

The talking storm troopers in the Star Wars pop up were also extremely popular. We have a Star Wars lover in our house so I think we will be revisiting this section shortly…

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Myer have really upped their personalised gifts this year, which are MY personal favourites. The Peanuts pop up store is particularly cute. Choose your artwork and name, et voila, custom artwork.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Preschoolers will love the array of Peppa Pig toys.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

This Toy Story booth is a cute photo opp for kids to pretend to be a toy on sale for Christmas.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Arty kids are covered with a particularly big arts and crafts area, including brands like Crayola and Seedling.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Another hit with the preschooler set is this huge Thomas the Tank Engine and toys.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

A bit of face painting fun at the craft station.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

The most popular item at the Giftorium this year – personalised Nutella jars. For only $12, it’s a gift that is unique, cheap and delicious. Myer is the only retailer in Australia to offer this service in-store. It’s available in all stores as well as online from November 6.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Christmas decorations abound with plenty of ideas for making your home look jolly.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Right in the back of the store is a mini train that gives free rides to kiddies.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Next to the train depot is this little indoor play area. Perfect for letting kids run their sillies out with one parent supervising while the other does some sneaky Christmas shopping.

Santaland is next door to the train – beat the queue by booking online. This year Santa has brought his reindeer with him – kids can give the slumbering Rudolph a little pat when they visit.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

Another personalision service available at the Myer Christmas Giftorium – custom Santa sacks and Christmas stockings.

The Opening of the Myer Giftorium via Christineknight.me

My two favourite takeaways from the Myer Christmas Giftorium.

Are you excited about Christmas too? What’s on your Chrissie wish list?

Sydney Festival: Highlights For Families

Sydney Festival Family-Friendly Events via christineknight.me
Viviana Cangialosi © Salvador Dalí, Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí.

The Sydney Festival is back for 2016 and loaded with family-friendly events. A lot of them are free and suitable for all ages. I’ve put together a round up of the best events for families with little kids, and two events for slightly bigger kids that look pretty good, too.

The People’s Tower
Drop by with kids on Jan 8 & 9 for a BOXWARS creative workshop. Kids can build and decorate their own miniature cardboard creations.
Darling Harbour
FREE

The Ephemeral City
Creative workshops for kids at BOXWARS Kids’ workshops 12-24 January, 2pm-7pm. Or try the flying fox 8-24 January, 2pm-8pm.
The Cutaway Barangaroo Reserve
FREE

Arquitectura De Feria
A fantastical playground for the whole family: think ferris wheels fitted out with toilet seats and a bicycle-powered carousel. 7-24 January Tue-Thur & Sun, 2pm-8pm, Fri & Sat 2pm-10pm. Closed Mondays.
Prince Alfred Square
Parramatta
FREE

Family Week
Free activities for kids during the school holidays. Drop by the City of Sydney’s Lawn Library, make masks with the Australian Museum and discover rhythms with Adam Page. The Silent Bubble Disco in particular looks like a lot of fun. Head to the website for more details on the event.
12-16 January
Festival Village
FREE & Ticketed events
Silent Bubble Disco: 12-15 January, 10am-3pm, 16 January, 12-3pm

Sydney Festival Family-Friendly Events via christineknight.me

Sunny Ray And The Magnificent Moon
A delightful show for littlies about what it’s like to stay up all night.
Ages 4 and up
12 January 3pm
13-16 January 10am & 12pm
Magic Mirrors Spiegeltent
45 mins
Tickets $25

Sydney Festival Family-Friendly Events via christineknight.me

Tolu
A family-friendly gravity-defying circus.
Ages 4 and up
14-16 January 1pm
The Famous Spiegeltent
45 mins
Tickets $30/27

Sydney Festival Family-Friendly Events via christineknight.me
Credit: Telia Neville

My Family’s Weirder Than Your Family
A funny family show by comedian Josh Earl.
Ages 5 and up
12 January 10am
13 January 11am & 1pm
14-16 January 11am
The Famous Spiegeltent
45 mins
Tickets $35

Australia Day
Various FREE events all over Sydney, such as a Wiggles concert on the Sydney Opera House forecourt (note the event is still ticketed even though it is free). See the website for info on all events happening.
Jan 26

The Rabbits
An adaptation of John Marsden and Shaun Tan’s picture book set to Kate Miller-Heidke’s score, alongside opera singers. Ages 8 and up.
14-24 January
Roslyn Packer Theatre
60mins
See website for ticket details.

Sydney Festival Family-Friendly Events via christineknight.me
Viviana Cangialosi © Salvador Dalí, Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí.

La Verita
Circus, clowning, acrobatics, dance and music. Ages 7 and up.
8-17 January
Riverside Theatre
125 mins incl interval.
See website for ticket details.

The Sydney Festival runs from Jan 7-26 2016.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Australia’s first museum has had a bit of a facelift. The aptly named Australian Museum recently unveiled a beautiful new entrance and exhibition that has brought a new lightness to the educational and cultural institution.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Another big change to the museum is their first permanent gallery to be added in over 50 years – Wild Planet. The gallery houses 400 animal specimens including lions and a very tall giraffe.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Upstairs, another new addition awaits – a roof-top cafe with an amazing view across the city skyline.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

We trialled the cafe on our visit during the school holidays. I was excited to see great kid-friendly items on the menu like the $8 lunch boxes, but when we went to buy our lunch at 1pm, most of the food, including the kids boxes, were sold out.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Their milkshake machine had also broken, so there wasn’t much in the way of food left except for adult sandwiches and fried chips. D’oh. On the plus side, you can head up to the cafe without paying admission.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

The kids’ favorite parts of the museum were the Wild Planet Activity Room and KidSpace.

The Wild Planet Activity Room costs $5 per child wanting to create a craft activity. When the kids got bored with colouring in their animal mobiles, they had fun dressing up and doing puzzles.

Wild Planet Activity Room
When: Daily
Time: 10am–3pm
Ages: All
Cost: Child $5, adults free (after general admission)
Booking: None required

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

The Kidspace area is free after admission and is especially designed for children under 5. The kids would have really been happy to just stay in the Kidspace all day. A great deal of thought has gone into this “mini-museum” to stimulate young children’s imaginations and introduce them to the natural world through real-life objects waiting to be touched, and specimens ready to be viewed under magnifying glasses.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Cheese really enjoyed the five cubby house “pods” that were filled with activities and natural materials.

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

For tiny ones there is a baby-friendly space designated for crawling babies only, fenced off to keep them safe. Additional kid-friendly features: pram parking, a bottle warmer (just ask one of the staff), change and feeding space.

Kidspace
When: Daily
Time: 9:30am-5pm
Location:Level 2
Cost:Free after admission

Wild Planet at the Australian Museum via christineknight.me

Australian Museum
1 William St, Sydney NSW 2010
Hours: Open daily, 9:30am-5pm
Prices: Adults $15, children under 16 free.

Rooftop Café - Australian Museum Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato